Looking for something new, but familiar, too? Try a reworked classic!

There are tons of books that are inspired by classic novels. Sometimes it’s a sequel in the same time period that follow beloved characters after the original ends. Or it could be a modern retelling of the same or similar plot, but with a contemporary setting and updated sensibilities. How much these reimagined stories adhere to the original varies widely, but they all begin with a love of the original source.

Read a revamped classic today! Here’s a Classical Remakes book list to get you started.

While you’re at it, why not read (or re-read) a classic, too? Here’s the Modern Library’s list of classics, and the Radcliffe Student’s top picks for best novels.

We’ll be discussing classics and reworked classics at our next Readers’ Round Table on Tuesday, December 19 at 2:00 p.m. As always, you can also discuss a different good book you’ve read that does not meet our monthly theme. The themes are just there to help you when you are feeling uninspired.

At the last Readers Roundtable, the theme was International Mysteries. Here’s a handy online list of first-in-a-series mysteries set outside the U.S. and England available at the library. Happy Reading!

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Admit it. You like to read stories about families more dysfunctional than your own. There’s nothing wrong with that.

As holiday family dinners loom over you, we’ve got some titles to remind you that your family is probably not as bad as you think. It’s all relative (sorry).

 

All the Ugly and Wonderful Things, by Bryn Greenwood

Commonwealth, by Ann Patchett

The Corrections, by Jonathan Franzen

Everything I Never Told You, by Celeste Ng

The House We Grew Up In, by Lisa Jewell

In Between Days, by Andrew Porter

The Nest, by Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney

This Is Where I Leave You, by Jonathan Tropper

The Turner House, by Angela Flournoy

We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves, by Karen Joy Fowler

We Were the Mulvaneys, by Joyce Carol Oates

You can find these titles and more in this booklist on our library catalog.

domestic

 

If you prefer real life stories, then try these memoirs instead:

The Autumn Balloon, by Kenny Porpora

Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant, by Roz Chast

Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight, by Alexandra Fuller

Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal, by Jeanette Winterson

 

And lastly, two books that are also movies available on DVD at the library:

The Glass Castle, by Jeannette Walls

August: Osage County, by Tracy Letts

 

Did we forget your favorite fractious family? Let us know!

 

Winner, winner, chicken dinner! Well, it’s not exactly dinner, but the winners of our last drawing of Three Good Books prizes did get a Starbucks gift card good for a small treat. Not too shabby.

We drew names from reviews from the past two weeks, as well as another drawing with all the participants over the summer who had not yet won a prize. Congratulations to the winners!

Here are some of the books mentioned in the final group of Three Good Books reviews. (We are only listing the titles and not the reviews due to participants’ request.)

Everything I Never Told You,
by Celeste Ng

The Genius of Birds, by Jennifer Ackerman

Growing a Feast, by Kurt Timmermeister

Legend, by Marie Lu

 

 

Let’s Pretend this Never Happened,
by Jenny Lawson

Never Let Me Go, by Kazuo Ishiguro

Pillars of the Earth, by Ken Follett

Rich People Problems, by Kevin Kwan

The Twelve, by Justin Cronin

 

Three Good Books was a program in conjunction with Alameda County Library’s Summer Reading Program for all ages. If you have not yet claimed your First and Second Prizes you are missing out. We have a limited amount of free books as prizes and the range of titles is getting smaller each day. So don’t dally any longer! You have until September 15, 2017 to redeem your prizes.

Thanks again to everyone who participated in our adult reviews program this summer. We hope everyone reading these posts found some good picks for their to-be-read list!

 

Congratulations to Abby, the latest winner in our adult summer book review drawing! Abby let us know about three books that she recommends and she won herself a Starbucks gift card. A good book and a cup of tea, what more could you ask for? Adult readers in Dublin have until Saturday, August 13 to submit their Three Good Books review and qualify for the next prize drawing.

Three Good Books is a program in conjunction with Alameda County Library’s Summer Reading Program for all ages. If you have not yet logged your reading times and activities, be sure to do so by August 24. While participants have until September 15 to claim their First and Second Prizes (free books y’all!), the Grand Prize drawing for participants who have earned 500 points or more will be held on August 25! Those who have made it to 500 points by that date will automatically be eligible, no need for an extra registration.

If you’re still searching for something good to read as you rack up your reading minutes, come and check out our Three Good Books display in the library, see our previous posts, or try some of these patron picks…

Abby chose:

 

Spaceman: An Astronaut’s Unlikely Journey to Unlock the Secrets of the Universe, by Mike Massimino
(autobiography)
riveting, inspiring, fascinating

Sous Chef: 24 Hours on the Line, by Michael Gibney
(non-fiction)
interesting, humorous, high-brow

Mr. Mercedes, by Stephen King
(fiction)
gripping, edge-of-your-seat action, thrilling

 

 

 

Elena recommends:

Brain Storms: The Race to Unlock the Mysteries of Parkinson’s Disease, by Jon Palfreman (bio-medical non-fiction)
poignant, timely, understandable

Port Chicago 50: Disaster, Mutiny, and the Fight for Civil Rights, by Steve Sheinkin
(historical children’s non-fiction, WWII era)
African-American literature, Local History, Sadness

The Resurrection Fields, by Brian Keaney
(science fiction)
Young Adult, Horror, Absorbing

What three words/phrases would you choose to describe that great book you just read? Library patron Steve, who recently won our latest drawing in Dublin’s Three Good Books program, chose “timely,” “thought-provoking,” and “chilling” to entice readers to try the book Exit West, by Mohsin Hamid.

Sure, we could tell you the plot of a book, but sometimes it’s more fun and  informative to talk about how a book makes you feel, or what the experience of reading a particular book is like.  That’s what inspired this summer program for adults and I hope you’re finding it as interesting as I am.

There’s still time to submit your Three Good Books. You can reply to this post or come in to the library and pick up the form at our display. The last day to submit your entry is Sunday, August 14.

Here are Steve’s three books and two more submitted recently. Happy reading…

 

Steve’s Three Reads:

Exit West, by Mohsin Hamid, (dystopian fiction)
timely, thought-provoking, chilling

When Books Went to War: The Stories that Helped Us Win World War II,
by Molly Guptill Manning, (nonfiction)
touching, unexpected, evocative

Holy Sh*t: A Brief History of Swearing,
by Melissa Mohr, (nonfiction)
bawdy, clever, surprising

 

 

Alex recommends:

 

 

Ukridge, by P. G. Wodehouse (fiction)
entertaining, quick-witted, enjoyable

Leave it to Psmith, by P. G. Wodehouse (fiction)
gripping, fast, hilarious

The Clothes They Stood Up In,
by Alan Bennett (fiction)
thought-provoking, unusual, uncanny

 

 

 

 

Bethany’s picks:

Relativity, by Antonia Hayes (fiction)
intriguing, realistic, scientific

Dear Ijeawele,
by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (non-fiction)
feminist, supportive, open-minded

The Martian, by Andy Weir (science fiction)
funny, futuristic, scientific

Have you told us your Three Good Books yet? As we mentioned a few weeks ago, the Dublin Library is asking adults this summer to share three good books that they’ve read recently. Tell us the title/author, what type of book it is (fiction/non-fiction) and three adjectives that describe the book and you will be eligible to win a gift-card in our monthly drawings now through August 13.

It’s easy as sweet cherry pie to participate and… drumroll… we have our first winner!  Vivian submitted the following three good books and three reasons to read each title. Thanks, Vivian for your enticing descriptions!

Submitted by Vivian C.

1984, by George Orwell (dystopian fiction)
Thought-provoking, compelling, captivating

Stumbling on Happiness,
by Daniel Gilbert (non-fiction, psychology)
Interesting, informative, fascinating

The Outliers,
by Malcolm Gladwell (non-fiction, psychology/sociology)
Eye-opening, educational, helpful

 

And here are three more entries from Dublin Library patrons to whet your appetite for good reads this summer:

 

Submitted by Anonymous

Everything, Everything,
by Nicola Yoon (Young Adult fiction)
Fresh, twisting, loving

The Nest, by Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney (Fiction)
Sad, passionate, fresh

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix,
by JK Rowling (Children’s Fiction)
Powerful, funny, exciting

 

 

Submitted by Liane R.

 

 

Moloka’i, by Alan Brennert
(historical fiction about life, love & leprosy)
A great summertime read

Year of Wonders, by Geraldine Brooks
(historical fiction about a woman during the time of the plague)
A heart-wrenching story

A Fine Balance, by Rohinton Mistry
(historical fiction about India in the 1970s)
Makes you feel blessed to live in the USA!

 

 

Submitted by Elena S.

On the Road with Janis Joplin, by John Byne Cooke (biography)

Orphan Train, by Christing Baker Kline (historical fiction)

Gracefully Grayson, by Ami Polonsky (children’s fiction about a transgender person)

 

Come by the library today to see our display and add your own three good books! We’re having three more prize drawings before the program ends. Plus, if you haven’t yet signed up for the Summer Reading Program, you can still do so and get even more prizes. Yes, adults can play, too!!

Looking for a few good books? Come by the library this summer and see what others are suggesting, and leave your own suggestions, too!

Now through August 13th, 2017, the Dublin Library is asking adults to share three recent reads that they have enjoyed and three adjectives to describe each title. Come in and see our display at the library and fill out our Three Good Books form.

When you turn in your Three Good Books form you will be entered in our twice-monthly drawings for $5 gift certificates to Starbucks. Enjoy a snack or drink with your beach read!

Here are Three Good Books submitted by some Dublin Library staff…

Adult Librarian Diane’s choices:

The Sun is Also a Star, by Nicola Yoon
Teen Fiction
smart, endearing, romantic

A Gathering of Shadows, by V.E. Schwab
Fantasy set in alternate Londons (book 2)
thrilling, engaging, clever

Homegoing, by Yaa Gyasi
Fiction- Family Saga
engrossing, intense, eye-opening,

 

Teen Librarian Mary’s picks:

The Radium Girls: The Dark Story of America’s Shining Women, by Kate Moore
Non-fiction (history, science)
Engrossing, poignant, unsettling

Bull, by David Elliott
Teen/YA (verse, mythology)
Entertaining, twisted, comical

Daughter of the Pirate King, by Tricia Levenseller
Teen/YA, Fantasy/Adventure
Fun, sarcastic, daring

Adult Librarian Eugene’s books:

The Invention of Wings, by Sue Monk Kidd
Historic Fiction
Informative, ante-bellum society, gripping

Rocket Girl, by George D. Morgan
Biography (of author’s mother, a space scientist in the 1950s)
Inspiring, informative, presentation of societal attitudes

City of Women, by David R. Gillham
Historic Fiction (Berlin in last years of Third Reich)
Thriller, spies, resistance

Now that you have some good books to read, sign yourself up for Alameda County Library’s online Summer Reading Program for all ages!  It’s not just for the kids. No matter how young or old you are, you can read books and do activities to earn free books and enter a grand prize drawing. Just register online, log the time you’ve read and/or do the activities listed to earn points.

That should keep you busy and entertained this summer! As always, come in to the library or contact us for more reading and listening suggestions.