Books


Thanks again to everyone who participated in Blind Date with a Book last month. The winner of the prize drawing has been notified. For the rest of you, how about a consolation read? Here are two books readers discovered through a Bind Date that were given a top rating of 5 stars.


Review by Valerie:

One of Us, by Tawni O’Dell

I give this book: 5 stars

What I liked about it:
Absolutely masterful, rich storytelling packing an emotional punch. Great look into a mental illness, class struggles and what evil really means. I have been recommending this book to my friends and coworkers.

Three adjectives that describe this book:
Captivating
Psychological
Poignant


Review by Roberta:

The Trolley Problem, or Would You Throw the Fat Guy Off the Bridge? A Philosophical Conundrum,
by Thomas Cathcart

I give this book: 5 stars!

What I liked about it:
This little book is a crash course in philosophy 101 presented in an easy-to-read delightful style using the classic “runaway trolley” scenario: would you pull a switch and divert the trolley to a different track thus avoiding killing 5 people, but killing one person on the second track? Is it the morally right thing to do, or is it manslaughter? Read the moral, ethical, philosophical and legal opinions of ancient and modern philosophers. Lawyers, jurors, journalists, educators, clergy, etc. Then YOU decide!

Three adjectives that describe this book:
Fun
Philosophical
Ethically challenging!

Did you pick up one of our specially wrapped books this year? If so, don’t forget to turn in your blind date book review! And if you haven’t yet gone on a Blind Date with a Book, then hurry now into the library. We’ll be taking down the display this Thursday night, February 21.

For the uninitiated, every February the Dublin Library wraps up some of our adult books, both fiction and non-fiction, where you can’t see the author or the title. Short descriptions or teasers are written on the books to help you decide if a book is right for you. You take it home, unwrap it, read it, and rate the book. Reviews turned in to the Information Desk by March 7th will be entered into a drawing for a gift card good for a movie night for two.

Even if you don’t win a prize, you can discover a new favorite author by participating in Blind Date with a Book. Here are two reviews that came in recently:

Review by Jeanne:

A Small Indiscretion, by Jan Ellison

I give this book: 5 stars!

What I liked about it:
Well-written with flashbacks carefully weaving all characters in the story mysteriously together. I also liked the description of Paris & London.

Three adjectives that describe this book:
Compelling
Emotional
Reflection
Impossible to describe in only 3 adjectives. A very good book.




Review by Misha:

The Cartoon Introduction to Philosophy,
by Michael F. Patton and Kevin Cannon

I give this book: 4 stars

What I liked about it:
This book offers a thorough and impressive introduction to philosophy, which is an interesting and complex subject. Although I found some terms and explanations difficult to understand at times, I definitely enjoyed the clever and funny illustrations in the book along with the exceptional details about well-known philosophers. I recommend this book to everyone!

Three adjectives that describe this book:
Entertaining
Informative
Complex

Teen Book Talk features book, movie, and local event reviews written by local teen writers. This week, we’re sharing a review of a movie, The Upside of Unrequited.

Teen reviewers select which books and movies they’d like to review, and also which local events to attend and review. All opinions are those of the reviewers. **Teens use a scale of 1-5 stars, with one star being poor and five stars being excellent, for their reviews**

Sahana N., teen reviewer

Book Title: The Upside of Unrequited

Author: Becky Albertalli

Book Format: Book

Year of Publication: 2017

Appeal: Young Adult

Rating: 5/5

 

At 17, Molly Peskin-Suso is filled with love, as unrequited as it may be, its still love. She’s had 26 crushes but never tried anything because of her insecurities of being fat. Her twin sister on the other hand, Cassie is the complete opposite. She’s stunning, looks amazing in whatever she decides to throw on, and is talented in the field of love.

One day, Cassie meets a girl named Mina. She’s immediately smitten and admittedly has trouble confessing to her crush. After she gets a bit more comfortable, Mina and Cassie start to date, making Molly feel lonelier, and more unwanted than ever.

Fortunately, Cassie has an idea and wants to set up Mina’s best friend, “hipster Will” with Molly. Anxious to spend more time with Cassie and maybe even receive her first kiss, Molly wills herself to like the cute redhead that keeps popping up.

When Molly starts her summer job, she meets Reid, a chubby Tolkien super fan with his interesting love for Cadbury mini eggs, and a dorky laugh. Suddenly she finds herself wishing to spend more and more time with this cute guy who seemingly occupies most of her mind. Could this be once more unrequited love? Could this be “Molly crush” number 28? Or could this maybe be true?

I enjoyed this book because it explored many characters. The differences between each were vivid and easily spotted. The main theme of this book was also that different is okay. We see characters of different body weights and accepting that they are beautiful as well. We see characters who are a part of the LGBTQ+ community and are proud to be so. Most importantly we see characters confident in being themselves, teaching readers a good lesson.

Love, Simon fans will enjoy this book very much because it’s written by the same author. Molly is Abby’s cousin and in this book we explore her background. This book doesn’t incorporate any aspects of fantasy but takes you on a journey through real life. That being said, I would still recommend it to any fans of The Selection, Red Queen, An Ember in the Ashes, or YA series with action, just because it’s an easy read and a great story! I would especially recommend it to John Green fans because the two have similar writing styles.

Another reason I enjoyed this story is the way it is told. Molly’s perspective is fresh, new, and unheard of previously. Most books we read with female main characters talk about how beautiful they are. Take Red Queen, the book isn’t centered on beauty but we do understand how beautiful Mare is. In The Selection, America’s beauty is unrefined and unique, making Maxon fall for her from the start. Finally, in The Ember in the Ashes, Laia catches Elias’ eye even as a servant just because of her looks. On the other hand, Molly is a girl who is chubby, a characteristic our modern world doesn’t encourage. We see as she finds herself and who she really is as well as becomes comfortable in her own skin.

 

Teen Book Talk features book, movie, and local event reviews written by local teen writers. This week, we’re sharing a review of One of Us is Lying by Karen M. McManus.

Teen reviewers select which books and movies they’d like to review, and also which local events to attend and review. All opinions are those of the reviewers. **Teens use a scale of 1-5 stars, with one star being poor and five stars being excellent, for their reviews**

Lipi B., teen reviewer

Book: One of Us Is Lying
Author: Karen M. MacManus
Book Format: Book, Audiobook
Year of Publication: 2017
This book will appeal to those who enjoy murder mysteries and crime fiction with teen protagonists. You may enjoy this book if you liked the books Pretty Little Liars and Bone Gap.
Age Range: 14 and up
Rating: 4.5 stars

It’s Monday afternoon, and five students walk into detention. Among them are: Bronwyn, the Yale-bound and academically motivated rule follower, Addy, a ready made homecoming princess, Nate, a criminal on probation for drug dealing, Cooper, a star baseball pitcher, and Simon, the collectively disliked creator of the high school’s popular gossip app. However, Simon dies before the end of detention. After further examination, an accidental death is ruled out, leaving the four students that were in the room with him as suspects for his murder. What’s even more intriguing is the fact that the day before he died, Simon had secrets about each of the four students in the room queued up to post for everyone to see. So, which one of them was willing to kill to protect their secret? Or were they the perfect scapegoats for someone else? One of Us Is Lying is a story about deception, finding hidden truths, and above all, how far one can go to preserve their secret.

One of Us Is Lying is likely one of the most exciting books I’ve read in awhile. The book does not hesitate to jump straight into the action, with the story starting off with the murder that is the central focus for the rest of the story. Though this story is a murder mystery, Karen M. MacManus truly gives the characters their own voices and unique perspectives, providing the reader a real connection and attachment to each student. The character development in One of Us Is Lying is something of a marvel, as the case progresses, the characters become their own independent figures with different interests, romances, and lives. Even though each perspective change is labeled at the start of the chapters, I found the characters easily identifiable and distinctive. The pacing of this story is just right, fast enough to prevent boredom but not so fast that the events become confusing.

One of Us Is Lying succeeds where many other books tend to fail-providing an equal amount of personal information and case information. Many other stories tend to get carried away with the character’s personal lives and sideline the case until the very end. However, One of Us Is Lying manages to equally distribute both parts throughout the story. This book does have some thematic elements in it, but nothing too serious; I would urge only ages 14 and up to read it. I devoured this book in one sitting, and thought about it for days afterwards. It is my belief that no book can be
perfect, but this book was near perfect. I highly recommend this book for anyone who enjoys murder and/or mysteries, and it is my hope that you will find it as exciting and intriguing as I did.

Upcoming teen releases in 2019 that I’m looking forward to reading!

(listed in no particular order. All links go to http://www.goodreads.com as it is too early for them to be listed in the library’s catalog.)

The Gilded Wolves by Roshani Chokshi

You Asked for Perfect by Laura Silverman

The Girl King by Mimi Yu

Sleepless v.2 by Sarah Vaughn

Ninth House by Leigh Bardugo

Sherwood by Meagan Spooner

Internment by Samira Ahmed

 

waking-cropped

How does one cope with senseless violence? Join us for a documentary about how one community worked together to overcome tragedy, stand up to hate, and create a safe town for all, after worshipers at a Sikh temple were killed by a white supremacist. A guided discussion afterwards will help people reflect on the film and current events.

Waking in Oak Creek Film Screening and Discussion
Thursday, November 15th

6:00 – 7:30 p.m.
Virginia Bennett Room

Waking in Oak Creek” depicts the year following a tragic hate crime at a Sikh temple in suburban Wisconsin, as thousands gather for vigils and community events to honor the victims and seek connection. Together, a community rocked by hate is awakened and transformed by the Sikh spirit of relentless optimism.

The documentary is 35 minutes long and will be followed by a discussion led by a representative from Jakara Movement, a grassroots community-building organization. This event is in honor of United Against Hate week, visit their website for more events happening in communities around the Bay Area.

 

Can’t make the event, but want to know more about strengthening community, teaching tolerance, and respecting diversity? Then check out the following book lists:

 

Children’s book list for United Against Hate: Children’s books about being kind, accepting, and inclusive towards everyone
come with me

Sample book:

Come with me, by Holly M. McGhee,
illustrated by Pascale Lemaitre

Frightened by news of angry people around the world, a young girl gets her parents’ help in learning to be compassionate and brave a little at a time

 

 

Adult book list for United Against Hate: Books about the aftermath of tragedy, the power of forgiveness, and the importance of building community
chughbook

Sample book:

The Person You Mean to Be: how good people fight bias, by Dolly Chugh

An award-winning social psychologist reveals her research findings in unconscious bias and offers tools for respectfully and effectively talking about politics, being a better colleague to people who don’t look like you and influencing change. 50,000 first printing.

 

 

Adult books on Kindness and Gratitude

Sample book:

Triumph of the Heart: forgiveness in an unforgiving world, by Megan Feldman Bettencourt

When Megan Feldman Bettencourt found herself embittered after a breakup and a string of professional setbacks, she met an extraordinary man named Azim. Azim had forgiven the man who killed his beloved only son, and even reached out to the killer’s family. He truly seemed to be at peace.

 

 

Immigrant Stories: Adult and Teen fiction and nonfiction about immigrants and refugees

 

Sample book:

The Newcomers: finding refuge, friendship, and hope in an American Classroom, by Helen Thorpe

Follows the lives of twenty-two immigrant teenagers from nations devastated by drought or famine or war, over the course of their first school year in America.

 

 

Diverse Memoirs: See a new perspective with these biographies by people of color from the past few years

 

Sample book:

Heavy: an American memoir, by Kiese Laymon

An essayist and novelist explores what the weight of a lifetime of secrets, lies and deception does to a black body, a black family and a nation teetering on the brink of moral collapse.

Were you unable take a trip this summer? Then why not travel by book! As our summer reading program nears its end (pick up your prizes by August 11th, y’all), here are some books to remind you that Reading Takes You Everywhere:

travelogue titles

For non-fiction readers, try one of these travelogues. From the icy Antarctica to the world’s densest jungle, vicariously travel to fascinating and sometimes dangerous locales from the safety of your favorite reading chair!

For those who prefer fiction, here are some mysteries set outside the U.S.  Since there are so many mysteries set in modern and historical England, we’ve purposely excluded British mysteries to help you mix it up a bit. Did we miss your favorite international mystery series? Let us know in the comments.

Want fiction set in a specific place? Then search our catalog for the destination name and “fiction,” such as Paris fiction, Italy fiction, or India fiction. Try it the next time you are planning a trip abroad to familiarize yourself with a place.

Want to stay on more familiar grounds? Then try some road trip fiction. Lots of drama flows when folks are stuck together in a car. Or sometimes an individual’s road trip can be a catalyst for a larger emotional journey.

Lastly, try some books in translation. Originally published in a different language, these books often take place in a different country and provide a unique and worldly perspective. (As an added bonus, you may also use these books to fill some 2018 Reading Challenge categories, like “Book set somewhere you’ve never been, but would like to visit” or “Book translated from a different language.”)

So, where are you traveling to next?

 

 

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