Books


Tomorrow, February 14 is the last day to pick up a Blind Date with a Book! Don’t forget to turn in your reviews by March 7. Even if the date was a dud, you can still win a tasty treat (courtesy of Nothing Bundt Cakes). Luckily, our first two submitted blind dates were rave reviews. Come by the library to pick up these books or for help in finding your next 5-star read.

Jeanne’s review:

lively- dancing

Dancing Fish and Ammonites, by Penelope Lively
I give this book: 5+ stars

What did you like/not like about it?
I liked everything about this book. I can relate to reminiscing about the past (I am 71 – Penelope was 80 when she wrote the book). We both appreciate passions of childhood — the love of literature, gardening. There is an awareness of how times have changed in the last 50 years.  This book was pure pleasure to read. I can’t give it enough kudos.

Three adjectives that describe this book are:
sentimental, historic, attitude – reflection, age/metamorphosis

 

Tiffany’s review:
crusie-agnes

Agnes and the Hitman, by Jennifer Crusie and Bob Mayer
I give this book: 5 stars

What did you like/not like about it?
I love the pace of the story & the dynamic between the two main characters. The writing is very engaging & the story full of humor. ♥ this book! What a romp!

Three adjectives that describe this book are:
quirky, fun, good

 

Thanks Jeanne and Tiffany for your reviews! They are now eligible for our prize drawing, and you can be to, if you turn in your Rate-the-Date review card by Wednesday, March 7, 2018.

 

 

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Let the library set you up with your next read…  Try a blind date with a book!

Up until February 14th,  you can pick out a specially wrapped book from our display at the library. And don’t forget to tell us how it went! You can win a prize even if your date was a flop. There’s nothing to lose, and so much to gain.

Sure, it may be hard to pick a book when you can’t even see it’s cover, but we’ve provided some profile information to help you find a good match. Here are three eligible books waiting for the right reader.  Is one of these books just what you were looking for?

See what catches your eye. Check out the book and take it home. Unwrap. Read. Enjoy!  Introduce it to your friends. Show it your favorite places to read. If you don’t like the book, simply return it to the library and pick another, its feelings won’t be hurt.

In addition to potentially finding your next reading love affair, inside each wrapped book is a Rate-the-Date Book Review form. Fill it out and return the form to the Information Desk by March 7th, and you’ll be entered in a drawing for a sweet gift card, courtesy of Nothing Bundt Cakes! Stay tuned, and we’ll share some of our favorite reviews here on this blog.

So take a chance. Stop by the library and grab a book. Who knows? Maybe there’s a bright future for the two of you!

(This program is intended for consenting adults only, but teens can participate too.)

reading challenge

Ever get overwhelmed with all the books on your to-be-read list? Or are you the type who goes into the library with no clue what you want to read next? This year, the Dublin Library is helping you focus your reading strategy for the year. Welcome to the 2018 Reading Challenge!

Our reading challenge offers up twelve categories to diversify your reading and expand your horizons. It’s meant to be inspiring, not stifling. You decide what qualifies for what category, we won’t judge. You have the whole year to finish, so there’s room for you to read outside the list, too.

Throughout the year we’ll be highlighting books that fit the categories in the Challenge. Stay tuned for more blog posts to help you complete the task. We also want to hear from you about what books you are excited to read this year, or what types of books you’d like to try but want help finding. The library is here to help!

Below is a sneak peek at our 2018 Reading Challenge. You can download the full pdf document to print, or pick up a copy at the library. Happy reading everyone!

 

 

Looking for something new, but familiar, too? Try a reworked classic!

There are tons of books that are inspired by classic novels. Sometimes it’s a sequel in the same time period that follow beloved characters after the original ends. Or it could be a modern retelling of the same or similar plot, but with a contemporary setting and updated sensibilities. How much these reimagined stories adhere to the original varies widely, but they all begin with a love of the original source.

Read a revamped classic today! Here’s a Classical Remakes book list to get you started.

While you’re at it, why not read (or re-read) a classic, too? Here’s the Modern Library’s list of classics, and the Radcliffe Student’s top picks for best novels.

We’ll be discussing classics and reworked classics at our next Readers’ Round Table on Tuesday, December 19 at 2:00 p.m. As always, you can also discuss a different good book you’ve read that does not meet our monthly theme. The themes are just there to help you when you are feeling uninspired.

At the last Readers Roundtable, the theme was International Mysteries. Here’s a handy online list of first-in-a-series mysteries set outside the U.S. and England available at the library. Happy Reading!

franzen-corrections
Admit it. You like to read stories about families more dysfunctional than your own. There’s nothing wrong with that.

As holiday family dinners loom over you, we’ve got some titles to remind you that your family is probably not as bad as you think. It’s all relative (sorry).

 

All the Ugly and Wonderful Things, by Bryn Greenwood

Commonwealth, by Ann Patchett

The Corrections, by Jonathan Franzen

Everything I Never Told You, by Celeste Ng

The House We Grew Up In, by Lisa Jewell

In Between Days, by Andrew Porter

The Nest, by Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney

This Is Where I Leave You, by Jonathan Tropper

The Turner House, by Angela Flournoy

We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves, by Karen Joy Fowler

We Were the Mulvaneys, by Joyce Carol Oates

You can find these titles and more in this booklist on our library catalog.

domestic

 

If you prefer real life stories, then try these memoirs instead:

The Autumn Balloon, by Kenny Porpora

Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant, by Roz Chast

Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight, by Alexandra Fuller

Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal, by Jeanette Winterson

 

And lastly, two books that are also movies available on DVD at the library:

The Glass Castle, by Jeannette Walls

August: Osage County, by Tracy Letts

 

Did we forget your favorite fractious family? Let us know!

 

Congratulations to George Saunders, this year’s winner of the Man Booker Prize for his novel, Lincoln in the Bardo! Have you read it? What did you think?

Here’s what one of the prize judges had to say about the novel:

“The form and style of this utterly original novel, reveals a witty, intelligent, and deeply moving narrative. This tale of the haunting and haunted souls in the afterlife of Abraham Lincoln’s young son paradoxically creates a vivid and lively evocation of the characters that populate this other world. Lincoln in the Bardo is both rooted in, and plays with history, and explores the meaning and experience of empathy.”

See the Man Booker Prize’s blog for more commentary on the winner.

The Man Booker Prize goes to the best literary fiction written in English, as voted on by a panel of five judges. Originally limited to authors from the United Kingdom & Commonwealth, the Man Booker was recently expanded to include any author writing originally in English and published in the UK. This is the second American in a row to win the prize.

Here are the other titles that were nominated for the Man Booker Prize this year:

Autumn, by Ali Smith

History of Wolves, by Emily Fridlund

Exit West, by Moshin Hamid

4 3 2 1, by Paul Auster

Elmet, by Fiona Mozley (no library copy, sorry)

Also try this list of past award winning books! It includes Man Booker, National Book Award, National Book Critics Circle Award, and more.

 

With our busy lifestyles, sometimes it’s hard to find the time to just sit and read.  If you’ve got a stack of unread books and feel like getting out more, you can take care of both situations with Dublin’s Silent Book Club!

On the third Tuesday of the month, from 3:00 – 4:00 pm, the library hosts an adult quiet reading hour. We’ll be setting up a room with a few comfortable chairs, closing the door, and giving you space to escape into a good book. Even though we call it a book club, we’re not discussing or reading the same book. It’s just a way to schedule some reading time and be around others who appreciate and share a passion for reading.

If you’re feeling social, you can come early and join us for our Readers’ Round Table. From 2:00 – 3:00 pm on the third Tuesday of the month, we spend time talking about the books we’re reading and enjoying. Share your latest find, or find a new author to try! While these two programs happen on the same day, you do not need to attend one to come to the other. Pick what feels right for you.

At last month’s Readers’ Round Table one participant recommended the book The Widow of the South, by Robert Hicks. She admitted it was slow to start, but full of detail about life in the South during the Civil War. The characters come to life as you get into it. You learn some history and get some romance. It’s also about how the main character’s home gets taken over by the Confederacy and turned into a hospital.

This prompted another participant to recommend the PBS television series Mercy Street, a somewhat gritty but captivating show about a family-owned hotel turned into an army hospital in Union-occupied Virginia. There’s a mix of interesting characters and perspectives including the Boston widow newly arrived as a nurse, a free black man with untapped medical skills, and a Southern belle whose entitled world has been utterly shaken. Find the DVDs for both seasons at the library.

What new book or show might you discover next? Join us on October 17 to find out!

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