July 2011


Here are some more book reviews submitted by patrons enjoying the Dublin Library adult summer reading program.

Revolution : the year I fell in love and went to join the war by Deb Olin Unferth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“What to say besides trite.  If you are a teenager, have never travelled, or read any adventure stories, you might pick this up.  But while I like good biographies, this hardly counts.  It would be like me sending my teenager to “save the world”, with no language skills other than English.  Naive at best.

Would you recommend this book to somebody?  “No, don’t pick it up.”

Submitted by Anonymous

Easter Island by Carlos Mordo ; [translation: Graciela Smith]

 

 

“Ever since the gigantic sculpture appeared in the movie, “Night at the Museum”, I was fascinated by this art.  Only upon reading this book did I discover a) How large they actually are.  b) How long ago the island was inhabited.  c) How sculptures varied from point to point on the island.  d) The lengths the islanders went to survive.  If you really want to “get away”, then pick up and checkout this historical gem.”

Would you recommend this book to somebody? Most definitely

Submitted by Anonymous

Helmet for my pillow : from Parris Island to the Pacific, a young Marine’s stirring account of combat in World War II  by Robert Leckie

This extraordinary memoir of the WWII battles of Guadalcanal, New Britain, and Peleliu by the 1st Marines is made readable by the surprising flashes of laugh-out-loud humor while detailing the carnage of war.  Leckie was a newspaper man who went on to write many books.  This one was incorporated into the HBO mini-series “The Pacific“.  An excellent read.

Would you recommend this book to somebody? Yes

Submitted by Eileen

 

Thanks again for all our patrons who submitted all these wonderful reviews!

As the fifth and last film in the Novel Destinations Summer Film Series, Dublin Library will be showing “Gigi,”  based on  the play by lyricist Alan Jay Lerner and composer Frederick Loewe, which itself was based on the novel by the French novelist and performer Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette,  at 2:00 p.m. in the Library Program Room, on Saturday, July 23rd. 

In this film, which won 9 Oscars in 1959,  a rich playboy (Louis Jourdan) and a youthful courtesan-in-training (Leslie Caron) enjoy a platonic friendship, but it may not stay platonic for long. Gaston, the heir of a wealthy family finds emotional refuge from the superficial lifestyle of upper class Parisian 1900s society with the former mistress of his uncle and her outgoing granddaughter, Gigi. When Gaston becomes aware that Gigi has matured into a woman, her grandmother and aunt, who have educated Gigi to be a wealthy man’s mistress, urge the pair to act out their roles but love adds a surprise twist to this delightful turn-of-the 20th century Cinderella story.  

Movie trivia:

Gaston’s walk through Paris while singing “Gigi” uses camera magic to make parts of Paris which are miles apart seem adjacent to each other. This technique, called “creative geography”, was created and named by French filmmaker and novelist Jean Cocteau.

Most of the film was shot on location in Paris, with the last few numbers being completed in an apartment that MGM constructed on their backlot. 

When Alan Jay Lerner met Leslie Caron in London to discuss the film with her, he was surprised to discover that Caron, who was of French birth, had become so immersed in the English culture that she had lost her French accent.

The day after the movie won nine Oscars, M.G.M telephone operators were instructed to answer all phone calls with “Hello, M-Gigi-M.”

The Novel Destinations Summer Film Series are all free of charge and are being shown in conjunction with the “Novel Destinations – Read Your Way Around the World” adult summer reading game.    Instructions and game forms are available on the display table right next to the adult public access computer terminals in the library.

As the fourth film in the Novel Destinations Summer Film Series, Dublin Library will be showing “The Joy Luck Club,”  based on the best-selling novel by Amy Tan,  at 2:00 p.m. in the Library Program Room, on Saturday, July 16th. 

This film, beautifully made and emotionally moving, is the story of the lives of four remarkable Chinese mothers and their trying relationships with their American daughters.  This epic film, directed by Wayne Wang, is based on the best-selling novel by Amy Tan.

Movie trivia:  Author Amy Tan appears in a cameo shot chatting with guests just beyond a doorway in the first party scene. 

The Novel Destinations Summer Film Series are all free of charge and are being shown in conjunction with the “Novel Destinations – Read Your Way Around the World” adult summer reading game.    Instructions and game forms are available on the display table right next to the adult public access computer terminals in the library.

Here are some more book reviews from patrons enjoying the Dublin Library adult summer reading program.

Asleep : the forgotten epidemic that remains one of medicine’s greatest mysteries by Molly Caldwell Crosby

  “The brain is a vast untapped resource – but you already knew this.What this book covers is what we do not know, the true life   experiences of people frozen in time.  The medical mystery is yours to figure out because just like a sickness, it struck without warning.  It traveled across the Atlantic Ocean, and faded into medical history.  If you ever wanted to expand your mind, this book will help you get there.  Since i live with a neurological disease, this book answers some lingering questions.  open the door yourself and be enlightened by this book.

Would you recommend this book to somebody? Yes

Submitted by Anonymous

 

 

Red scarf girl : a memoir of the Cultural Revolution by Ji-li Jiang

  “Empathy is gained either from firsthand knowledge (someone I know who suffered), or through intimate stories that stay with us.  This book is an account of human beings caught in the web of  China’s “cultural revolution” without their knowledge, and what the side effects would be.  As Americans, there is a flaunting of freedoms.  But what if our freedoms were suddenly taken away?  Is it not better to be educated?  This book helps us look at China’s transformation, and the cost to many of its innocent citizens.  For younger readers, a companion book I would recommend is “Revolution is Not a Dinner Party by Ying Chang Compestine .

Would you recommend this book to somebody? Yes

Submitted by Anonymous

 

The strange return of Sherlock Holmes by Barry Grant

If you love reading Sherlock Holmes, you will enjoy both books.  Sherlock Holmes is brought back as master detective into the modern age.  He solves crimes with his friend Wilson (his Watson) using his own knowledge and also some modern techniques.  What fun! I can’t wait for the next book in the series.”

Would you recommend this book to somebody? Yes

Submitted by Eileen

Thanks again for all our patrons who submitted reviews!

As the third film in the Novel Destinations Summer Film Series, Dublin Library will be showing Alfred Hitchcock’s 1946 film “Notorious” at 2:00 p.m. in the Library Program Room, on Saturday, July 9th. 

Following the conviction of her German father for treason against the U.S. and his suicide in prison, Alicia Huberman (played by Ingrid Bergman) takes to drink and men. She is approached by a government agent T.R. Devlin (played by Cary Grant) who asks her to spy on a group of her father’s Nazi friends operating out of Rio de Janeiro, even going so far as to marry wealthy German businessman Alexander Sebastian (played by Claude Rains). 

The Novel Destinations Summer Film Series are all free of charge and are being shown in conjunction with the “Novel Destinations – Read Your Way Around the World” adult summer reading game.    Instructions and game forms are available on the display table right next to the adult public access computer terminals in the library.