February 2009


 

2009 Officers of the Dublin Friends2009 Officers of the Dublin Friends

 

 

We got some good news Friday night at the City’s annual Volunteer Appreciation Dinner for Dublin Volunteers.  The Dublin Friends of the Library were chosen as the “Organization of the Year” for 2008.  It was a surprise and quite an honor to win this award. We received a plaque from the City, a certificate from Congressman Jerry McNerney, and a framed certificate from Assemblywoman Mary Hayashi, plus a $500 check for the Friends organization.

 Thank you to Karin Welss for writing and submitting the essay outlining our achievements for 2008. Your writing conveys our groups’ work so well, it made all the difference in our winning the award.

Congratulations to everyone and a huge thank you to all the people who have worked so hard this past year to make our booksales successful and provide the kind of support our Library needs.  These include all the officers of the Friends, Eileen Billik, Treasurer, Judith Seilhymer, Vice-President, Connie Archer, Secretary, as well as Jean Olds who does all our publicity, George Schoening, Karin and Fritz Welss, and Library staff support from Peggy Tollefson and Lee Jouthas.

 

We have another booksale coming soon, March 6 through the 9th, so we will see you there!

Posted for Noreen DiVito, President of the Friends by LJ

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                                                                                                          Can you account for the apathy, the antipathy of this nation to their own history?  Is there not a repugnance to the thought of looking back?  While thousands of frivolous novels are read with eagerness and got by heart, the history of our own native country is not only neglected, but despised and abhorred. 

                          – John Adams, August 31, 1813

 

Americans are often accused of being having little knowledge of history.  As the quotation of our second President John Adams demonstrates, this perception of Americans is nothing new. 

 

Part of the problem is that not all our presidents have been very memorable.  Robert Dallek, retired professor of history, author of books on Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Lyndon Baines Johnson, John Fitzgerald Kennedy, and Richard Nixon states:  “Most presidents, retrospectively, come across as ineffective.  Most of them are nameless, faceless characters who don’t register on anyone, including historians.” 

 

Those presidents who most of us – historians and non-historians alike – do remember were presidents who led the country during times of crisis and governed effectively or those who achieved great notoriety.  Our new President has often stated that he likes to read biographies of his predecessors in the White House.  Looking back over the lives of earlier presidents has become fashionable. 

 

Some of the most readable histories of memorable presidents available through the Alameda County Library System are:

 

B ADAMS, J   “John Adams”  by David McCullough

 

B JOHNSON, L.  vols. 1, 2  “The Years of Lyndon Johnson” by Robert A. Caro

 

B LINCOLN    “Lincoln” by David Herbert Donald

 

B ROOSEVELT, T   “The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt” by Edmund Morris

 

B TRUMAN, H.  “Truman” by David McCullough

 

973.7092  GOODWIN  “Team of Rivals:  the Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln” by Doris Kearns Goodwin

 

973.91 KENNEDY “Freedom from Fear:  the American People in Depression and War” by David M. Kennedy

 

973.922 SCHLESINGER  “A Thousand Days; John F. Kennedy in the White House” by Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr.

 

973.92409 DALLEK   “Nixon and Kissinger:  Partners in Power” by Robert Dallek

 

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Free Tax Assistance is available at the Dublin Library every Saturday, beginning February 7th and continuing until April 11th from 10:30 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. in the Group Study Room.

This program is jointly sponsored by the IRS and AARP. Trained volunteers assist with U.S. Federal and California State income tax and e-filing.

Appointments are available for morning sessions. Starting January 15, 2009, call the Dublin Library at 925-803-7275 during normal open hours or sign up at the Reference Desk. Drop-ins with no appointment are welcome at any time from 10:30 a.m. until 3:00 p.m. and will be served on a first come, first served basis, subject to availability of volunteer staff.

The following links will give you more information about taxes and tax assistance sites near you:

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Basic federal and state tax forms are available at the Dublin Library.  One can also download forms from the following links: 

Chinese New Year or Spring Festival is the most important of the traditional Chinese holidays. It is often called the Lunar New Year, especially by people in mainland China and Taiwan. The festival traditionally begins on the first day of the first month in the Chinese calendar and ends on the 15th; this day is called Lantern Festival.

Celebrated in areas with large populations of ethnic Chinese, Chinese New Year is considered a major holiday for the Chinese and has had influence on the new year celebrations of its geographic neighbors, as well as cultures with whom the Chinese have had extensive interaction. These include Koreans, Mongolians, Nepalese, Bhutanese, and Vietnamese.  

Although the Chinese calendar traditionally does not use continuously numbered years, its years are often numbered from the reign of Emperor Huangdi outside China. But at least three different years numbered 1 are now used by various scholars, making the year 2009 “Chinese Year” 4707, 4706, or 4646.

Dublin Library had its own celebration of the Year of the Ox on Monday, February 2nd.   Children’s librarians Monica Ten Eyck and Sue Rodriquez, together with crafts specialist Christie Inocencio, presented a “design your own Chinese dragon” program.  The Community Room was filled with more than 80 children and adults who created their very own dancing. We even had a few dragons receive names from their creators. One beautiful purple dragon ended up with the name Violet, while many others received the name of their designer. We even had a group of special needs children come to the program to enjoy making unique dragons of their own.